Ben Carr Reflects on the Impact His Father Had on his Golf Game and Life

3 MONTHS TO THE DAY AFTER BEN CARR'S FATHER PASSED AWAY HE WON THE SOUTHEASTERN AMATEUR

Former Columbus high and current Georgia Southern Sophomore golfer Ben Carr entered the Southeastern Amateur confident he could win on his home course. 

“Every part of my game that needed to be clicking for the southeastern amateur was clicking,” says Carr. I told my brother I was feeling pretty good and I thought we had a good chance.” 

After the first two rounds of the tournament, Ben had the lead and was in the final pairing for the third round.

That round started with an hole out for eagle on 2, followed by a birdie on 4 and six more birdies on the back nine.

When the round was over, he broke the course record with a 61 and was eight shots clear of the field.

“It kind of crept in to my mind, 59’s in play, course record is in play. If I can’t get 59 I want to get the course record. I had four good looks and made two of them. I got the course record, didn’t get 59, but I’ll take 61 all day long,” Carr chuckled. 

The final round of the tournament, the day before father’s day, Ben fired a 68 to win the Southeastern Amateur by 10 shots.

But for the first time after one his tournament victories his father wan’t there to congratulate him.

His dad, who had been there for all of his little league games and golf tournaments passed away unexpectedly in March.

“My dad is the one who got me into the game. He put a golf club in my hand when I was just a couple years old. He took me to every tournament and was always there when I was finishing out on 18 and would give me a hug rather I had just won or finished in 40th,” says Carr. “To do it 3 months after he passed away, the day before fathers day, you can’t tell me that’s not destiny.

While his dad wasn’t there in person, his lessons stayed with Ben for moments like this.

“He taught me to be humble in victory and in defeat. Just to take all the positives from every round, not dwell on the negatives even when you’re not playing well. It’s hard to not think about why you’re not playing well, but think about what you are doing well and why that will make you a better player in the future. He taught me to be positive and keep my head down and keep trucking.”

Coming off the green with his brother Sackett at his side, the first person to congratulate him was his mom.

“It hit me, I started crying as soon as I saw her. It was pretty special that she was the first person I saw. Good to get a hug from her knowing I had won.” 

Carr’s great stretch of golf continues. On Monday he qualified for the Georgia state amateur which will take place at Settindown Creek July 11-14.

Categories: Georgia Sports