Voters Choose New Auburn Mayor

Four City Council Seats Also Decided in Runoff Election

It was a big election for the city of Auburn.

Voters decided their next mayor and their next city council member in wards two, four, five and six.

 

Here are results from Tuesday’s election:

AUBURN MAYOR

RON ANDERS, JR.        54.2%

DAVID HILL                    45.8%

 

AUBURN CITY COUNCIL WARD 2

KELLEY GRISWOLD        63.6%

TODD SCHOLL                 36.4%

 

AUBURN CITY COUNCIL WARD 4

BRETT SMITH     63.5%

JIM RYAN            36.5%

 

AUBURN CITY COUNCIL WARD 5

STEVEN DIXON                59.3%

WALTER NORTHCUTT     40.7%

 

AUBURN CITY COUNCIL WARD 6

BOB PARSONS      50.8%

SARAH BROWN     49.2%

 

“It’s a critical time right now. Big turning point and a lot of change,” said Auburn voter Katie Malone.

Auburn voters calling it a historic election since Mayor Bill Ham has held the seat for the last 20 years and a runoff in a number of wards.

“Now we are having to turn it over to someone new. We hope we can continue that with our new mayor and city council,” said Auburn voter Joanna Reaves.

“I think we would like to see our elected officials regard this not as a career, but a true position of service. I think it’s time to have fresh view points in Auburn,” said Auburn voter Alice Bell.

Those at the polls were pleasantly surprised with the turnout.

“People have steadily come in since the polls opened at 7 this morning,” said Auburn voter Dave Heideman.

In fact more than a 1,000 people came out to vote at the Dean Rd. location before noon.

“We’ve had a steady flow all day. We had 200 voters the first hour and it’s just picked up ever since,” said Election Inspector Carolyn Carr.

Carr adds they have more voters turnout this runoff than the municipal election back in August.

“People are wound up about certain issues in the city,” said Carr.

Voters said those hot button issues like building height in downtown and how to handle a growing city is why they came out Tuesday.

“The interest in what’s going on I think that’s why people are here. If they were satisfied and content you would have a lower voter turnout. I think people are frustrated with the way Auburn’s been moving. This is the loveliest village and we would like to see it remain,” said Heideman.

Those elected Tuesday will officially take their seats on November 5.

Categories: Alabama News

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